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Artwork by Gavin Cheng, a NorCal-based artist.
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keisoenartworks@yahoo.com

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Personal Questions that rose from viewing Wasteland

1. What longterm impacts are create when making art that involves people who, in ways, benefit from the experience?
2. What is the connection between art and society, and what is being communicated?
3. When does artwork cross a line from being artwork to becoming a message for a movement?
4. How are artists who create art that reflects society seen in the very society they create it in? What else does the artist then embody when the art creates an impact?
5.Although the documentary is primarily about Vic Muniz, how is it that the primary subject begins to revolve around the participant of his art project?
6.Is Vic Muniz simply the catalyst for the participants to become the real artists when they fully embody their story and allow it to be told?
7. Was Vic Muniz simply benefiting from this experience for his own gain in the end when he begins to discover material gain is no longer a necessity and uses this experience as a means to test his wants and desires in life?
8. Although in the end it tells of the after-story to each participant, what is actually crossing their minds after experiencing a world beyond their own and how they see themselves now?
9. With the knowledge and experience of higher living standars and lifestyles, is the knowledge a negative impact on them because now they know a better life that could be their own?
10. What is social justice artwork? And what does it have to do to create an impact?
11. Is the line that draw an artist and an activist incredibly thin? 
12. How has social justice artwork in the past affect the world and was it always successful?
13. What is the societal view towards artwork and what are those expectations?
14. Did this documentary truly tell the full story of the experience or was Vic Muniz just characterized into a protagonist of a nice story?
15. Was the goal of the documentary to tell about the artist, the people, or the art created during the process?
16. After showing the impact the artwork had on the participants, what impact did it have to the audience and general viewers who did not know the backstory to it? What did they read from what was presented before them?
17. Was Vic Muniz impacted by this experience in such a way that could change the direction of his artwork? Can this be said to any type of artist?
18.Why was it that Vic Muniz chosen to create a documentary from and no other artist who perhaps done the same type of artwork? Can it be said that Vic Muniz was successful then?
19. To what kind of audience is the documentary aimed towards and if it is geared towards young artists, what impression will that give them?
20. In what direction is artwork moving towards with the direction society is being developed in the modern age? IS artwork in some ways a major reflection of the society the artist lives in?

(Source: Wikipedia)



→ Posted 6/6/13
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Interview with Gavin as an Artist

The interview was conducted by Iris Xie, a prominent English major and close friend who is also active in the art scene.

Iris: Alright lets jump right down to it, what is a major consideration you take in the creation of your artwork?

Gavin: A major consideration? I would definitely say the need to complete the aesthetic purposes of any piece as a whole, to not allow any areas to extend and fall short of rounding up the composition in unity.

Iris: Why would you say this needs to be accomplished?

Gavin : To be perfectly honest, there is no deeper meaning to accomplishing aesthetic unity except that I enjoy the achieving aesthetic perfection. Perhaps to ties closely to my technical background in art to be concise and on-point during my process. As an artist, I am largely technical with my pieces where they feel tight and secure rather than free-forming and loose.

Iris: When did you establish yourself as an artist with this specific aesthetic?

Gavin: I believe it started when I began drawing portraits did I try to achieve the finest details and reappropriation on the image before me. To achieve replication and realness, I practiced immensely on the technical execution of creating the piece and also the aesthetic to achieve the same level of emotion and tone with the image or face towards my piece.

Iris: Where were you when this began?

Gavin: It must ahve been freshman year of college that I began to practice portraits because I was heavily influenced by my friend’s techinical prowess in drawing portraits that I also wanted to achieve the same.

Iris: Since then, have you developed in any way from your base aesthetic as an artist?

Gavin: I would say i have. The growth had definitely fostered under that sculpture courses I have taken since then. With these classes was I able to learn more about material, form, and shape more deeply, manipulating and creating art at a hands-on level, different from drawing.

Iris: Would you say you had to same level of aesthetic technique and technical wit with sculpture as you did with drawing.

Gavin: Before, yes. Presently, no. Before I created pieces with so much depth in concept and understanding that I would not allow the viewer to create any other interpretation. Doing so made my pieces into possessions of myself and also a medium for self-reflection towards the me, the artist, to the audience. Since then however, I began to learn about organic structure and development from the famed sculpture Anthony Caro. I grasped that art is allowed to exist as a separate being, not needing to latch onto the artist as a possession and can also develop naturally or, organically.

Iris: how would you say you responded to organic process?

Gavin: I love it! It’s definitely something I am always proud of in the end with my art. Before with the strict concepts I would create for my artwork, I could easily be let down by having so many expectations but with organic process, I become part of the audience as well viewing the final product as if for the first time, never really knowing what would be the outcome. I find this experience much more invigorating and fulfilling.

Iris: Which would you prefer- sculpture or drawing now that you have touched on both?

Gavin: I feel even though sculpture forced me to become more experimental with my art and made me grow significantly in such a short amount of time, I will always have a sweet spot with drawing. Drawing is the medium in which I made my first artwork as a child and it just touches home on so many different levels.

Iris: Do you think you can apply what you learned through sculpture to your drawings?

Gavin: Although I have not done so yet, I truly hope that I can. Every discovery I made in sculpture is something I take with me and wish to apply to drawing. I believe there are even more possibilities waiting for me if I begin to apply organic process to drawing.

Iris: For my last question I would like to know, how do you feel about where you are as an artist right now?

Gavin: Honestly, I am really excited. This year has been full of discovery and growth that I want to apply to myself in so many different ways that I can not wait for the art that I will create from now on. I think that I am growing every day with each thing I learn and I just need to pull myself to start applying these techniques to what I’ve already known but never tried.



→ Posted 6/6/13
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Artist Book- Colorful



→ Posted 6/6/13
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Artist Book- Puzzlement

Artist Book- Puzzlement



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Artist Book- Diary of Nature



→ Posted 6/6/13
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→ Posted 6/5/13
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→ Posted 6/5/13
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→ Posted 6/5/13
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Bling bling Jonghyun! My bias haha. Had alot of fun making this piece :)

Bling bling Jonghyun! My bias haha. Had alot of fun making this piece :)



→ Posted 4/3/13
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A gamer never quits, an artist never stops.

A gamer never quits, an artist never stops.

(Source: keisoenartworks.com)



→ Posted 3/7/13
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